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Beth Simone Noveck

Beth Simone Noveck

Beth Simone Noveck directs the Governance Lab (GovLab) and its MacArthur Research Network on Opening Governance. She is a Professor in Technology, Culture, and Society at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering and a Fellow at NYU’s Institute for Public Knowledge. Beth serves as the Chief Innovation Officer of the State of New Jersey. Beth also serves on the International Advisory Board of the NHS Digital Academy and the Steering Committee for the Collective Intelligence Conferences. She is the author of Smart Citizens, Smarter State: The Technologies of Expertise and the Future of Governing (Harvard Univ Press 2015) and Wiki Government: How Technology Can Make Government Better, Democracy Stronger and Citizens More Powerful (Brookings 2009). Her next book, Public Entrepreneurship: Training the Next Generation of Public Leader and Problem Solver, will appear with Yale Press.

Poonam Joshi

Poonam Joshi

Poonam Joshi is the Executive Director of the Sigrid Rausing Trust. She has over 20 years' experience of working on a range of human rights issues. Prior to joining the Trust, Poonam was the Director of the European Office for Trust grantee the Fund for Global Human Rights, where she was also responsible for work on the enabling environment for civil society. Between 2010 and 2012 Poonam worked as a consultant to the Sigrid Rausing Trust, where she was Acting Director of the Women’s Rights programme and from March 2011 developed the Trust’s new grantmaking strategy for the Middle East and North Africa. She also worked for seven years with Amnesty International UK’s women’s rights programme, where she represented AIUK as a gender expert on a range of issues including political participation in Egypt and Libya, human trafficking in the UK, religious fundamentalism, and counter-terrorism. Poonam is a qualified solicitor, and began her career as a family and criminal legal aid lawyer in London. She holds a Masters in Development Studies from the School of Oriental and African Studies, and a BA in English from Oxford University.

Aarathi Krishnan

Aarathi Krishnan

Aarathi Krishnan specialises in humanitarian futures and strategic foresight, and is the Global Futures and Foresight Coordinator with the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent (IFRC), as well as a Futures Fellow with IARAN. She has a background in development program management and policy, and spent a lot of her early development career working across Africa and Asia. Her work focuses on reimagining futures for the humanitarian system and on strategic organisational transformation for humanitarian organisations. She is currently co-leading the Global Strategy 2030 for the Red Cross and Red Crescent, a futures focused strategy aimed at transforming the Red Cross and Red Crescent network. She is particularly interested in the intersections of new forms of power, values and new humanitarianisms. Her practice covers both training, research, horizon scanning and experiential futures, with a specific lens on decolonised and feminist futures.

Examples of her work can be found at the Inter-Agency Research and Analysis Network and Fast Company.

Artemis Skarlatidou

Artemis Skarlatidou

Artemis studied Geography before she moved to London in 2004 to do an MSc in GIScience at University College London (Dept. of CEGE). In 2007 she started her Engineering Doctorate, sponsored by ARUP and EPSRC, in Virtual Environments Imaging and Visualisation (Dept. of Computer Science) and in 2011 she got the EPSRC Doctoral Prize Award. She is now a teaching and research fellow in the ExCiteS group.

In her EngD research she developed a framework for investigating trust and proposed a novel trust-oriented interface design for Web GIS applications that support public decision-making. She applied and evaluated her findings in the context of the site selection of a nuclear waste disposal facility in the UK. In her postdoctoral fellowship she extended her work in the online public crime mapping context and she developed and tested crime geovisualisations that improve public trust and usefulness.

At the moment she is working as a senior research associate in the following projects: ECSAnVis, DITOs and WeGovNow! Her research interests include Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and User Experience aspects (e.g. usability, aesthetics, trust) of geospatial technologies for expert and public use and citizen science applications. She is also interested in evaluation and trust issues within the context of VGI; Risk Communication; philosophical, as well as, ethical issues for the ‘appropriate’ and effective use of geospatial and citizen science technologies.

Relevant experts from other Nesta teams will also be contributing to our assessment process.