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Did you really take a hit? Understanding how video games playing affects individuals

This study addresses the important and recurring question of whether playing video games is detrimental to the socio-economic development of a person.

This study addresses the important and recurring question of whether playing video games is detrimental to the socio-economic development of a person.

It does this by using novel data from the Taking Part Survey in England to establish whether games playing is associated with particular socio-economic characteristics and/or other forms of cultural participation.

The results do not indicate any obviously negative effects of video games playing: rather, those who play are typically better educated and no less wealthy, and games players are also more likely than non-games players to participate in other forms of culture, particularly active forms of participation. These findings are reinforced when comparing the characteristics of individuals who did and did not play video games when younger.

Authors

Karol J Borowiecki, Professor at the Department of Business and Economics at the University of Southern Denmark and Hasan Bakhshi, Executive Director, Creative Economy and Data Analytics at Nesta

Authors

Hasan Bakhshi

Hasan Bakhshi

Hasan Bakhshi

Centre Director, Creative Industries Policy and Evidence Centre (PEC); and Executive Director, Creative Economy and Data Analytics, Nesta

Hasan oversees Nesta's creative economy policy, research and practical work.

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