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‘Soft Facts’ and Spontaneous Community Mobilisation: The Role of Rumour After Major Crime Events

This study examines how social media increasingly shape and frame processes of community mobilisation following major crime events.

Nesta Working Paper 15/08
Issued: May 2015
 

Abstract

This study examines how social media increasingly shape and frame processes of community mobilisation following major crime events.

In so doing, it illuminates social reactions that are frequently ‘seen but unnoticed’ in the aftermath of high profile crimes.

Pivoting around several case studies of community mobilization in difficult and emotionally tense situations, the analysis distils some generalisable lessons about how social media are transforming the ways contemporary social life is organised.

Author

Colin Roberts, Martin Innes, Alun Preece and Irena Spasić (Cardiff University)

The Nesta Working Paper Series is intended to make available early results of research undertaken or supported by Nesta and its partners in order to elicit comments and suggestions for revisions and to encourage discussion and further debate prior to publication (ISSN 2050-9820). The views expressed in this working paper are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of Nesta.

Authors

Peter Baeck

Peter Baeck

Peter Baeck

Head of the Centre for Collective Intelligence Design

Peter is responsible for a number of large scale research projects and experiments that explore how human and machine intelligence can be combined to solve social challenges.

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