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Investing for the good of society

This report presents compelling evidence which shows that wealthy individuals can be motivated to try social investments.

This report presents compelling evidence which shows that wealthy individuals can be motivated to try social investments.

Key findings: 

  • Many of the more affluent wealthy investors – those with over £100,000 in investment assets – can be motivated to try social investments.
  • They are motivated by a desire for their wealth to achieve a social good as well as have the potential to produce a return.
  • However investment motivations for the less affluent wealthy investors (with between £50,000 and £100,000 in investment assets) are much more diverse and complex. Social investment products for this group are therefore more difficult to present appropriately.

This research used a combination of approaches to reach the conclusion that the primary motivator for wealthy investors with over £100,000 in investment assets is 'social/ethical values'.

 

The potential for a lower return or for the need for social enterprises to work with government are not a barrier to involvement. The overwhelming motivation for becoming a social investor is that, as with other parts of their lives, their wealth should have a positive impact on society.

 

This publication is one in a series of three that sets out what we have learned about the social investment market through the Big Society Finance Fund – its current nature and its potential for growth.

 

Author:
Antony Elliott