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Cleanweb UK: How British companies are using the web for economic growth and environmental impact

Market scoping study to map how cleanweb technologies are emerging: where the innovation is coming from; what direction this trend could take in delivering change for sustainability; and the support required.

Market scoping study to map how cleanweb technologies are emerging: where the innovation is coming from; what direction this trend could take in delivering change for sustainability; and the support required.

Innovative new 'cleanweb' businesses are transforming the way change is being activated by individuals and companies delivering on their sustainability objectives. This is personified by Cleanweb companies like Nest Labs/Google, Zipcar/Avis, Opower/Utilities and The Climate Corporation/Monsanto. UK cleanweb companies are building innovative web technologies to solve global environmental challenges. These include DemandLogic, EnergyDeck, Loco2, Utilidex and Open Utility.

This paper's research hypothesis is that the cleanweb sector combining web technology innovation, new business models including collaborative consumption, and commercial sustainability objectives which is transforming the way in which change is activated by businesses, and that a clear map of this market sector is required for the UK to succeed in supporting this technological and business innovation. Much of this cleanweb innovation is fragmented, taking place in startups, and there is no clear view of the trends in this market nor direction for how this innovation will reach scale to maximise the public benefit.

The paper's objective is to explore and explain how companies are using this technology to deliver change and the areas of society where this benefits. This market scoping study will start to build the evidence base on which public support for the cleanweb sector can be built and targeted funding and private investment can be made to bring the best ideas to scale quickly.

Authors

Sonny Masero and Jack Townsend

This research was funded by our Bright Ideas Research Fund, which provided small grants to develop interesting research projects and policy proposals in fields that relate to innovation and are in areas outside of Nesta's programmes.

The views expressed in this research paper are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of Nesta.